A glamorous former St George Bank worker charged with defrauding her employer of more than $590,000 has strong links to organised crime through her husband, it can be revealed. 

Sarah Daizli, 29, was arrested inside a Sydney cbd xrp capsules venue on Wednesday, almost five years after she allegedly began ‘masterminding’ the ‘sophisticated’ fraud syndicate.

Footage showed the mother-of-two being placed in the back of a police van wearing a skintight jumpsuit and designer slides.

But the alleged backing of her glamorous life was revealed in a tense bail hearing at Central Local Court on Thursday, where Daizli’s links to the Sydney underworld were revealed. 

Daily Mail Australia can reveal she is the wife of convicted drug dealer David Sukkar, who was previously sentenced to more than 20 years in prison in Western Australia.

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Sarah Daizli, 29, was arrested inside a Sydney venue on Wednesday, almost five years after allegedly being the 'mastermind' of a 'sophisticated' fraud syndicate. She is the wife of well known Sydney organised crime figure David Sukkar, Central Local Court heard on Thursday

Sarah Daizli, 29, was arrested inside a Sydney venue on Wednesday, almost five years after allegedly being the ‘mastermind’ of a ‘sophisticated’ fraud syndicate.

She is the wife of well known Sydney organised crime figure David Sukkar, Central Local Court heard on Thursday

Daizli allegedly used her position at St George Bank to funnel money into bank accounts she controlled. Prosecutor Brendan Kitchener also revealed police had seized two overseas plane tickets worth $4000 in Daizli's possession that raised fears she could flee Australia

Daizli allegedly used her position at St George Bank to funnel money into bank accounts she controlled.

Prosecutor Brendan Kitchener also revealed police had seized two overseas plane tickets worth $4000 in Daizli’s possession that raised fears she could flee Australia

Sukkar was in court in support of his wife on Thursday as she was refused bail and told she would spend Christmas behind bars.

The court heard Daizli has access ‘to large amounts of money’ and ‘ties to organised crime’ through her husband.

Prosecutor Brendan Kitchener also revealed police had seized two overseas plane tickets worth $4000 in Daizli’s possession that raised fears she could flee Australia.  

‘The defendant has ties to the organised crime community and her husband is still active in the organised crime community,’ Mr Kitchener said.

‘Two Qantas tickets have been purchased this month in the name of this person that police claim are fraudulent.

‘The fact sheet outlines the funds the police alleges she has access to in relation to these offences from 2016 to present.

‘She has access to large amounts of money… $50,000 [bail] to mitigate the risk of a flight is simply not even in the ball park.’

Sukkar was just 23 when he was arrested after arriving at the port of Albany with 100 kilograms of cocaine on a South American cargo ship in 2004.

He had grown up in war torn Lebanon before moving to Sydney.

He was sentenced to a maximum 21 years jail, with a 13-year non-parole period.

Sukkar sat uneasily at the back of the court as his wife appeared on screen in Central Local Court via video link from Surry Hills Police Station. 

'The defendant has ties to the organised crime community and her husband is still active in the organised crime community,' Mr Kitchener told the court in opposing Ms Daizli's bail

‘The defendant has ties to the organised crime community and her husband is still active in the organised crime community,’ Mr Kitchener told the court in opposing Ms Daizli’s bail

Daizli also allegedly convinced a fellow St George Bank employee to help her out by making eight transfers totalling $18,600

Daizli also allegedly convinced a fellow St George Bank employee to help her out by making eight transfers totalling $18,600

NSW Police allege that Daizli began her ‘sophisticated’ scheme while working for the St George Bank in 2016.

Between February and December she allegedly stole eight drivers licences and used the details of those people to create fake bank accounts, court documents revealed. 

Daizli then allegedly used her ability as a St George Bank employee to move cash in to these accounts, all of which she controlled.

Between February 19, 2016 and April 26, 2017 she moved $111,241 into one account. 

Between June 28, 2016 and October 26, 2017 she funnelled $70,230 into another.

Between November 24, 2016 and October 30, 2018 she transferred $348,801 into another.

Financial Crimes Squad Commander Detective Superintendent Linda Howlett said investigators dismantled the alleged criminal syndicate. Pictured: Sara Diaz Sukkar

Financial Crimes Squad Commander Detective Superintendent Linda Howlett said investigators dismantled the alleged criminal syndicate.

Pictured: Sara Diaz Sukkar 

During this time Daizli also allegedly made personal loan claims for ‘a fictitious St George Bank customer’ amounting to $61,399.  

She also allegedly convinced a fellow St George Bank employee to help her out by making eight transfers totalling $18,600.   

The court heard evidence that Daizli also stole credit cards and on one occasion a yellow post-it-note with an individuals details, including address and date of birth. 

Mr Kitchener submitted in court that despite the offers to pay a surety the police had serious concerns about Daizli’s flight risk.

‘The defendant has access to multiple different identities.

Even if released on bail the defendant could access documents that allow her to leave the country,’ Mr Kitchener said.

‘There will not be the usual delay the court sees in relation to the composition of the brief of evidence.

‘The unit that is investigating these matters, the Financial Crimes Squad, was formed for the very purpose of investigating matters such as this, very serious frauds. 

‘In relation to that, a full time custodial sentence is almost inevitable if the defendant is found guilty of these offences.’

After bail was refused Daizli – who was wearing a black Adidas tracksuit – broke down in tears before telling Magistrate Quinn her business was legitimate. 

‘There’s a reason I have these peoples IDs….

it’s because I work in the industry still,’ she said. 

Magistrate Quinn acknowledged that while it would be difficult for Daizli being away from her children over Christmas, the prosecution case was ‘strong’.

She ordered the matter to return to Central Local Court on February 22, 2021. 

Detectives swooped on Sara Daizli at a venue on Wednesday December 9 and arrested her

Detectives swooped on Sara Daizli at a venue on Wednesday December 9 and arrested her 

Anauthorised bank transactions valued at $590,000 had allegedly been made from various accounts between February 2015 and October 2018

Anauthorised bank transactions valued at $590,000 had allegedly been made from various accounts between February 2015 and October 2018

NSW Police begun investigating the syndicate last May, but only arrested Daizli this week after uncovering two more alleged offences. 

Daizli was handcuffed and loaded into the back of a police van dressed in a tight, grey onesie and designer gold slides. 

She could be heard muttering ‘ew’ as she stepped into the van’s holding cell.

Two other people, a 28-year-old man and 26-year-old woman, were also arrested last week and charged for their role in the alleged fraudulent bank transactions.

NSW Police searched a Liverpool business and seized computers and documents in various names. 

Financial Crimes Squad Commander Detective Superintendent Linda Howlett said police officers dismantled the alleged criminal syndicate after a long investigation.

‘It will be alleged in court that this woman used her employment to facilitate unauthorised fraudulent bank transactions valued at nearly $600,000 over a two-year period,’ Det Supt Howlett said.

She was loaded into the back of a police paddy wagon donning a tight, grey onesie and designer slides. She could be heard muttering 'ew' while inside

She was loaded into the back of a police paddy wagon donning a tight, grey onesie and designer slides.

She could be heard muttering ‘ew’ while inside

‘This includes nearly $350,000 allegedly siphoned from an elderly individuals’ retirement and personal accounts – essentially stealing all of their savings.

‘Criminal offences of this nature are not only financially debilitating, but also emotionally distressing for victims, and anyone involved in stealing the hard-earned wages and savings of others is disgraceful.

‘The methods used to obtain the funds involved a high degree of planning.

They were complex, of a large monetary value and designed in a way to concealed and abuse the trust of her employer and customers.

‘Investigations of this nature are extremely complex and involve working in close collaboration with financial institutions to uncover the full extent of the alleged crimes committed.’

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